Waiting for Matera…

Waiting for the 47th National Conference, to be held in Matera from 27 to 29 May 2021, AIA proposes “Waiting for Matera …” an interesting cycle of free educational seminars, in webinar mode.

The program includes 12 events (6 in autumn and 6 in spring) which will be held on some Fridays of each month during the lunch break, from 13.30 to 14.30.

The speakers will mainly be young researchers and professionals, experts in acoustics and in other disciplines related to the study of sound.
We will start by talking about soundscape during the lockdown and global comfort at the time of COVID, then moving on to acoustics in school environments and the design of spaces for teaching, through the introduction of new technical tools such as machine-learning and regulatory tools such as UNI 11532-2: 2020. We will then discuss noise in densely occupied places, restaurants and wind farms, sensor and monitoring networks, virtual reality simulations and applications, wooden buildings, acoustic metamaterials, vibroacoustic methods for elastic/viscoelastic characterization. of materials and structures, of performance-based design; issues related to the most recent developments in applied acoustics.

Free events for AIA Members and Non-Members. The issue of professional training credits is not foreseen.

The webinar cycle “Waiting for Matera” is one of the initiatives of the International Year of Sound 2020-2021.

AUTUMN WEBINAR

Friday 2 October 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Measurements of noise and perception of the sound landscape at the time of Covid-19

Moderator Sergio Luzzi

The COVID-19 pandemic spread to Europe after a few months of first appearing in China and Far Eastern countries and before spreading across the planet. The virus has had and is having terrible consequences on people’s health, governments and health authorities of various countries have often reacted by introducing restrictive measures to contain the phenomenon, including the closure of buildings and public areas until the complete lockdown. In this critical scenario, however, some positive effects were also observed. From an environmental point of view, in fact, during the lockdown there was a reduction in road traffic, as well as a reduction in navigation and air transport activities, which led to a significant benefit for air quality and emissions of noise in the cities.
During the seminar we will discuss the consequences that the pandemic has had in terms of objective reduction of noise levels, but also in relation to the perception of the sound landscape by citizens.
A summary of the results of the noise monitoring carried out, using smart sensors, in an urban area of ​​the city of Monza, before, during and immediately after the lockdown, will be shown, using the data collected by the LIFE MONZA project. Some results of two international projects will then be shared, the first of which aimed at the documentation and subsequent analysis of the changes in the sound landscape, conducted in the different phases of the lockdown in a town in the Basque Country, in northern Spain; The second, The Sound Outside, which tells of the lockdown in the world during the first phase of the pandemic and which saw the participation of more than 100 sound professionals from various countries. The data objects presented will then be discussed from a philosophical point of view, in order to understand how our auditory perception has been strongly influenced by listening to the sounds of cities “in silence”.

Relatori

Chiara Bartalucci

Chiara Bartalucci she is post-doc researcher at the Department of Industrial Engineering of the University of Florence. Since 2018 she has been the holder of a research grant at the University of Florence and collaborates with Vie en.ro.se Engineering, mainly in the field of European design. She participated in the writing and management of several European projects, such as LIFE + 2008 HUSH, LIFE + 2010 QUADMAP, LIFE + 2015 MONZA. Her interests also concern soundscape, citizen science, global comfort and forensic acoustics.

Elvira Di Bona

Elvira Di Bona teaches philosopher of mind at the Department of Philosophy and Educational Sciences of the University of Turin. She deals with the philosophy of perception and musical aesthetics. Shee spent periods of study at UCL (University College London), New York University and the University of Sydney. She was a fellow of the Italian Academy of Columbia University in New York, a post-doc researcher at Freie Universität Berlin and Polonsky Academy Fellow at the Van Leer Institute in Jerusalem. She graduated from the Conservatory in the violin class, and from the Academy of Higher Improvement of Musical Studies of Santa Cecilia (Rome) in the solo violin class.

Sara Lenzi

Sara Lenzi is a sound designer and popularizer in the field of sound communication. Co-founder of the English-language web magazine sounDesign.info, she founded the first Italian sound branding agency, was manager and strategic advisor in the field of tech startups dedicated to sound and lecturer at Lasalle College of the Arts in Singapore. She is currently a PhD student in sonification at the Density Design Lab, Design Department of the Politecnico di Milano

Friday 16 October 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Global comfort in the days of COVID: rethinking learning spaces

Moderator Francesco Asdrubali

The environmental quality of school environments is a multidisciplinary theme that covers thermo-hygrometric, acoustic, visual and air quality aspects. These aspects are very strongly correlated with each other, particularly in the behavioral reaction of students. An example: despite being hot, would the students open the window if it looked out onto a noisy street?

The study of these issues has assumed great importance following the health emergency, when the well-being of students has become a priority for institutions and families.

The webinar will see the intervention of two speakers: Federica Morandi, collaborator of Prof. Andrea Gasparella (unibz) and a school director. The results of the #vogliamoinvertirelarotta project will be presented, a research carried out at the beginning of 2020 on comfort in classrooms, through the analysis of thermal, acoustic, visual comfort and air quality. Students’ evaluations and their behavior in reaction to a non-optimal environmental stimulus will be presented. And it will be an opportunity to read these data in light of the recent return to school.

Relatori

FM

Federica Morandi, research fellow at the Free University of Bolzano, works in the group of Prof. Gasparella on the themes of global comfort and high-performance wood construction. She participated in the activities of the project “Change is in the air”, developed by Agorà Activities with the aim of raising awareness among students and families on the environmental quality of school environments.

image0

Gaetana Iacobone, Headmaster of the IIS Margherita Hack di Morlupo, a reality that includes the Piazzi Scientific and Linguistic High School, the I.T.C.G. Nervi and the I.P.S.C.T. Rignano Flaminio. The IIS was involved in the “Change is in the air” project: students and teachers actively participated in the phases of environmental monitoring and in the collection of subjective assessments on environmental quality.

AG

Andrea Gasparella, Full Professor of the Free University of Bolzano and Vice Dean of Didactics for the Faculty of Science and Technology, is president of IBPSA Italy and a member of the board of the Italian Technical Physics Association. The research activities that he follows and coordinates cover the “Building Physics and HVAC Systems” sector, from the well-being of the occupants to energy modeling on an urban scale.

Friday 13 November 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Shut up! The effort of learning in a noisy classroom

Moderator Arianna Astolfi

Correctly hearing, understanding and memorizing the teacher’s explanations are essential aspects in the learning processes that take place within the classroom, and which require the establishment of correct verbal communication between teachers and students. Classroom acoustics are therefore of great importance in facilitating or hindering students in their learning processes, and it is essential to carefully design school environments with the primary objective of reducing background noise and controlling the sound tail.

Students who learn in classrooms with favorable acoustic conditions will be able to hear better what the teacher is explaining, keep attention focused while carrying out a task and, over the years, develop better phonological skills, math and reading-writing skills . Conversely, poor acoustics not only compromise students ‘performance in academic tasks but also affect the amount of cognitive resources required of students to perform those tasks, impacting the speed with which new information is received and students’ motivation to stay focused. on the task. These effects are more pronounced for students of lower grades (primary school, lower secondary school), i.e. for those age groups in which key skills are developed from a cognitive, linguistic and academic point of view.

Relatori

Chiara Visentin

Chiara Visentin, post-doc research fellow in Applied Acoustics at the University of Ferrara. Her research activity includes the study of the effects of the sound environment on the occupants and in particular of the effect of classroom acoustics on student learning. She is the author of several articles in scientific journals and contributions to national and international conferences.

Giuseppina Puglisi

Giuseppina Emma Puglisi, post-doc research fellow at the “Galileo Ferraris” Energy Department of Politecnico di Torino. Her activity is mainly related to the evaluation of the influence of classroom acoustics (noise and reverberation) on the voice production of teachers, on learning and speech intelligibility for learners of all levels. The activity, in recent years, has taken on an increasingly multidisciplinary character thanks to the collaboration with experts, among others, in the fields of medicine, neuroscience and statistics. Giuseppina is a member of the Italian Acoustics Association and the Acoustical Society of America, and is the author and co-author of numerous scientific contributions published internationally.

Sara Caviola

Sara Caviola, researcher in Developmental Psychology at the University of Leeds (UK) interested in numerical cognition and in particular in the influence of cognitive and emotional factors in mathematical success. Member of several national and international scientific associations, she is the author of several scientific contributions.

Friday 20 November 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Anthropogenic noise: what it is, how to measure it and how to mitigate it

Moderator Arianna Astolfi

Anthropogenic noise, ie the noise generated by people, has so far been kept on the border of acoustic regulations due to its nature of “non-reproducibility”. Consequently, the technical-acoustic community faces it in a partial way, despite being the main sound source and cause of disturbance in many contexts, such as nightlife environments, restaurants, open-plan offices and school environments.

While international research has been studying for some time the effects that anthropogenic noise causes on comfort, well-being and productivity, an open problem is that of its measurement. Typically the anthropogenic contribution is added to other sources of noise: in nightlife contexts to traffic noise, in offices to noise from systems, in classrooms to the teacher’s speech. Recent applications of simple data-analysis algorithms make it possible to isolate the anthropic contribution and quantify the contribution of sound emission, in compliance with current acoustic regulations.

Among the solutions to mitigate this noise source, acoustic treatments are not sufficient, therefore it is desirable to promote the use of new strategies capable of encouraging virtuous behavior in people. In this sense, noise awareness campaigns have been organized and monitoring devices have been introduced, such as an “acoustic traffic light” which continuously detects the level of anthropogenic noise and warns, through light feedback, when it becomes disturbing.

Relatori

Sonja di Blasio

Sonja Di Blasio, PhD Candidate in Management, Production and Design, is a researcher at the Applied Acoustics Group of the Politecnico di Torino. In her research activity she has been involved in the development and validation of a device for monitoring and controlling anthropogenic noise. She has participated in entrepreneurship and innovation programs.

Dario D_Orazio

Dario D’Orazio, electronic engineer, PhD in applied acoustics. He has been working in the applied acoustics group of the University of Bologna since 2007. He deals with the acoustic quality of performance, work and teaching environments. UNI expert member since 2011, he collaborated in the drafting of UNI 11532 standards.

IMG-20190121-WA0001

Enrico Gallo is an environmental engineer and has been working for the Public Administration for 15 years in the field of urban sustainability, GIS analysis and environmental acoustics. He represents Eurocities, the association of major European cities, at the Noise Expert Group of the European Commission. He has coordinated projects and implementation activities of Italian and European legislation at urban level, with contributions of procedural, technological and communication innovation, presented at national and international conferences. He is currently technical manager at the Environment Area of ​​the City of Torino.

Friday 27 November 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Dinner invitation: it takes an ear!

Moderator Sergio Luzzi

At the webinar will attend Prof. Bottalico, Eng Tombolato and Master Pizzaiolo Pappalardo as guests. Prof. Bottalico will discuss the results of a study on restaurant acoustics that involved participants over the age of sixty with and without hearing problems. The findings link background noise in a restaurant with diners’ vocal effort and conversation quality. Eng. Tombolato will discuss the acoustic design of catering facilities by introducing the concept of acoustic capacity. Master Pizzaiolo Pappalardo will discuss acoustics from the point of view of the restaurateur. Pappalardo is the owner of La Cascina dei Saporil in Rezzato (BS) winner of the “Best Acoustics” award assigned by the Guide of the Italian Touring Club “Hotels and Restaurants of Italy 2020” for the best acoustics with style in Northern Italy.

Relatori

Pasquale Bottalico

Pasquale Bottalico, Master’s degree in Telecommunication Engineering and PhD in Metrology, Politecnico di Torino. As a lecturer in Audioloiga at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign he deals with the interaction between speech and environmental acoustics. He has worked as a consultant in the environmental acoustics sectors. He is the author of 40 publications in impact journals on acoustics and about a hundred publications including conference articles and abstracts.



		
Andrea Tombolato

Andrea Tombolato, Master’s degree in Physics, University of Padova. He has carried out and continues his consulting activity in the acoustics and vibrations sectors for the benefit of companies, design companies, public bodies. He is an effective member of the Italian Acoustics Association (AIA); since 2014 he is a member of the Board of Directors. Since 2015 he has been included, representing AIA, the Italian Acoustics Association, in UNI Working Groups (National Technical Standardization Body) operating in the field of acoustics. In 2015 he was called to be part of the ISPRA / Ministry of the Environment working group aimed at adapting the national acoustic legislation to the European provisions of the sector, directives 2002/49 / EC, 2000/14 / EC and 2006/123 / CE and Regulation n. 765/2008 / EC. He is author and co-author of scientific works on acoustics.

Antonio Pappalardo

Antonio Pappalardo, Mastro Pizzaiolo, La Cascina dei Sapori, Rezzato (Brescia), I couldn’t say when my passion for cooking began, because I am convinced it was born with me, and it has always accompanied me. Even as a child I loved helping my parents while they worked in their restaurant, and it wasn’t just a game, there was more. Something was probably already starting to make me understand what my path would be, and I always tried to follow it. It was precisely following it that I chose the hotel school for my high school education, graduating in 2008. And always following the same path I started my first work experiences, from which I tried to make the most to give even more definition to my passion. I wanted my training in the kitchen to be complete, and at the same time help me to take a specific direction. I worked in the kitchen, pastry shop and pizzeria, and that’s how I understood that the right answer for me was pizza. Because with pizza I didn’t really have to choose, I knew I was giving my creativity the possibility of having no limits. From the appetizer to the dessert, any dish I wanted to make I could combine with a well-leavened disc of dough, transforming a dish that was already unique into something even more special.

Friday 11 December 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

The new UNI 11532-2: 2020 on school spaces

Moderator Arianna Astolfi

The new UNI 11532-2: 2020 standard for the acoustic quality of school environments aims to bring order in a field of standards that has been stratified over time and is not free from ambiguity. Made mandatory by the CAM of 2017, the standard is part of a broad context of European regulations on the subject (such as the English BB93, the German DIN 18041) introducing two substantial innovations. The first concerns the indication of a compliance interval of the reverberation time, according to the intended use and the volume of the environment. For intended uses that require the static presence of a person, this interval takes into account the acoustic absorption of the occupants. The second novelty concerns the forecast evaluation of the C50 / STI intelligibility criteria. The use of these descriptors, already anticipated in the CAM 2017, is detailed here and related to the specific context of the school environments (e.g. the role of background noise, the vocal effort of teachers …). The introduction of new design logics has consequences on the materials and on the different design criteria to be implemented according to the grade of the structure. Some case studies will be discussed and analyzed from several points of view: respect for design criteria, perception analysis, choice of materials.

Relatori

Dario D_Orazio

Dario D’Orazio, electronic engineer, PhD in applied acoustics. He has been working in the applied acoustics group of the University of Bologna since 2007. He deals with the acoustic quality of performance, work and teaching environments. UNI expert member since 2011, he collaborated in the drafting of UNI 11532 standards.

IMG_20191019_131513678

Daniele Ponteggia, graduated in electronic engineering from the University of Perugia and qualified to practice as an engineer, he is enrolled in the Order of Engineers of the Province of Terni. Competent technician in environmental acoustics.
He mainly works as a consultant in the field of architectural acoustics and electroacoustics with particular experience in the use of CAD acoustic measurement and simulation software. He is an expert in measuring and characterizing electroacoustic transducers.
It also deals with sound level measurements, drafting of acoustic impact assessments, on-site and forecast evaluations of the passive acoustic requirements of buildings, design of acoustic correction interventions.
He is a member of the Audio Engineering Society’s “Acoustic and Sound Source Modeling” and “Loudspeaker Modeling and Measurement” working groups.

CC

Cristina Carrus graduated in Building Engineering-Architecture. After working in the world of design, she attended the Master in Architecture, Structures and Technologies, deepening the issues relating to new construction technologies, environmental sustainability, energy efficiency.
In 2012 he began working for Ecophon Saint-Gobain, developing skills related to acoustics and acoustic comfort design. It carries out Market Development activities, researching different accounts and accompanying customers during the specification, design process up to the installation on site of the acoustic solutions adopted.

02/10/20

Friday 2 October 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Measurements of noise and perception of the sound landscape at the time of Covid-19

Moderator Sergio Luzzi

The COVID-19 pandemic spread to Europe after a few months of first appearing in China and Far Eastern countries and before spreading across the planet. The virus has had and is having terrible consequences on people’s health, governments and health authorities of various countries have often reacted by introducing restrictive measures to contain the phenomenon, including the closure of buildings and public areas until the complete lockdown. In this critical scenario, however, some positive effects were also observed. From an environmental point of view, in fact, during the lockdown there was a reduction in road traffic, as well as a reduction in navigation and air transport activities, which led to a significant benefit for air quality and emissions of noise in the cities.
During the seminar we will discuss the consequences that the pandemic has had in terms of objective reduction of noise levels, but also in relation to the perception of the sound landscape by citizens.
A summary of the results of the noise monitoring carried out, using smart sensors, in an urban area of ​​the city of Monza, before, during and immediately after the lockdown, will be shown, using the data collected by the LIFE MONZA project. Some results of two international projects will then be shared, the first of which aimed at the documentation and subsequent analysis of the changes in the sound landscape, conducted in the different phases of the lockdown in a town in the Basque Country, in northern Spain; The second, The Sound Outside, which tells of the lockdown in the world during the first phase of the pandemic and which saw the participation of more than 100 sound professionals from various countries. The data objects presented will then be discussed from a philosophical point of view, in order to understand how our auditory perception has been strongly influenced by listening to the sounds of cities “in silence”.

Relatori

Chiara Bartalucci

Chiara Bartalucci she is post-doc researcher at the Department of Industrial Engineering of the University of Florence. Since 2018 she has been the holder of a research grant at the University of Florence and collaborates with Vie en.ro.se Engineering, mainly in the field of European design. She participated in the writing and management of several European projects, such as LIFE + 2008 HUSH, LIFE + 2010 QUADMAP, LIFE + 2015 MONZA. Her interests also concern soundscape, citizen science, global comfort and forensic acoustics.

Elvira Di Bona

Elvira Di Bona teaches philosopher of mind at the Department of Philosophy and Educational Sciences of the University of Turin. She deals with the philosophy of perception and musical aesthetics. Shee spent periods of study at UCL (University College London), New York University and the University of Sydney. She was a fellow of the Italian Academy of Columbia University in New York, a post-doc researcher at Freie Universität Berlin and Polonsky Academy Fellow at the Van Leer Institute in Jerusalem. She graduated from the Conservatory in the violin class, and from the Academy of Higher Improvement of Musical Studies of Santa Cecilia (Rome) in the solo violin class.

Sara Lenzi

Sara Lenzi is a sound designer and popularizer in the field of sound communication. Co-founder of the English-language web magazine sounDesign.info, she founded the first Italian sound branding agency, was manager and strategic advisor in the field of tech startups dedicated to sound and lecturer at Lasalle College of the Arts in Singapore. She is currently a PhD student in sonification at the Density Design Lab, Design Department of the Politecnico di Milano

16/10/20

Friday 16 October 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Global comfort in the days of COVID: rethinking learning spaces

Moderator Francesco Asdrubali

The environmental quality of school environments is a multidisciplinary theme that covers thermo-hygrometric, acoustic, visual and air quality aspects. These aspects are very strongly correlated with each other, particularly in the behavioral reaction of students. An example: despite being hot, would the students open the window if it looked out onto a noisy street?

The study of these issues has assumed great importance following the health emergency, when the well-being of students has become a priority for institutions and families.

The webinar will see the intervention of two speakers: Federica Morandi, collaborator of Prof. Andrea Gasparella (unibz) and a school director. The results of the #vogliamoinvertirelarotta project will be presented, a research carried out at the beginning of 2020 on comfort in classrooms, through the analysis of thermal, acoustic, visual comfort and air quality. Students’ evaluations and their behavior in reaction to a non-optimal environmental stimulus will be presented. And it will be an opportunity to read these data in light of the recent return to school.

Relatori

FM

Federica Morandi, research fellow at the Free University of Bolzano, works in the group of Prof. Gasparella on the themes of global comfort and high-performance wood construction. She participated in the activities of the project “Change is in the air”, developed by Agorà Activities with the aim of raising awareness among students and families on the environmental quality of school environments.

image0

Gaetana Iacobone, Headmaster of the IIS Margherita Hack di Morlupo, a reality that includes the Piazzi Scientific and Linguistic High School, the I.T.C.G. Nervi and the I.P.S.C.T. Rignano Flaminio. The IIS was involved in the “Change is in the air” project: students and teachers actively participated in the phases of environmental monitoring and in the collection of subjective assessments on environmental quality.

AG

Andrea Gasparella, Full Professor of the Free University of Bolzano and Vice Dean of Didactics for the Faculty of Science and Technology, is president of IBPSA Italy and a member of the board of the Italian Technical Physics Association. The research activities that he follows and coordinates cover the “Building Physics and HVAC Systems” sector, from the well-being of the occupants to energy modeling on an urban scale.

13/11/20

Friday 13 November 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Shut up! The effort of learning in a noisy classroom

Moderator Arianna Astolfi

Correctly hearing, understanding and memorizing the teacher’s explanations are essential aspects in the learning processes that take place within the classroom, and which require the establishment of correct verbal communication between teachers and students. Classroom acoustics are therefore of great importance in facilitating or hindering students in their learning processes, and it is essential to carefully design school environments with the primary objective of reducing background noise and controlling the sound tail.

Students who learn in classrooms with favorable acoustic conditions will be able to hear better what the teacher is explaining, keep attention focused while carrying out a task and, over the years, develop better phonological skills, math and reading-writing skills . Conversely, poor acoustics not only compromise students ‘performance in academic tasks but also affect the amount of cognitive resources required of students to perform those tasks, impacting the speed with which new information is received and students’ motivation to stay focused. on the task. These effects are more pronounced for students of lower grades (primary school, lower secondary school), i.e. for those age groups in which key skills are developed from a cognitive, linguistic and academic point of view.

Relatori

Chiara Visentin

Chiara Visentin, post-doc research fellow in Applied Acoustics at the University of Ferrara. Her research activity includes the study of the effects of the sound environment on the occupants and in particular of the effect of classroom acoustics on student learning. She is the author of several articles in scientific journals and contributions to national and international conferences.

Giuseppina Puglisi

Giuseppina Emma Puglisi, post-doc research fellow at the “Galileo Ferraris” Energy Department of Politecnico di Torino. Her activity is mainly related to the evaluation of the influence of classroom acoustics (noise and reverberation) on the voice production of teachers, on learning and speech intelligibility for learners of all levels. The activity, in recent years, has taken on an increasingly multidisciplinary character thanks to the collaboration with experts, among others, in the fields of medicine, neuroscience and statistics. Giuseppina is a member of the Italian Acoustics Association and the Acoustical Society of America, and is the author and co-author of numerous scientific contributions published internationally.

Sara Caviola

Sara Caviola, researcher in Developmental Psychology at the University of Leeds (UK) interested in numerical cognition and in particular in the influence of cognitive and emotional factors in mathematical success. Member of several national and international scientific associations, she is the author of several scientific contributions.

20/11/20

Friday 20 November 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Anthropogenic noise: what it is, how to measure it and how to mitigate it

Moderator Arianna Astolfi

Anthropogenic noise, ie the noise generated by people, has so far been kept on the border of acoustic regulations due to its nature of “non-reproducibility”. Consequently, the technical-acoustic community faces it in a partial way, despite being the main sound source and cause of disturbance in many contexts, such as nightlife environments, restaurants, open-plan offices and school environments.

While international research has been studying for some time the effects that anthropogenic noise causes on comfort, well-being and productivity, an open problem is that of its measurement. Typically the anthropogenic contribution is added to other sources of noise: in nightlife contexts to traffic noise, in offices to noise from systems, in classrooms to the teacher’s speech. Recent applications of simple data-analysis algorithms make it possible to isolate the anthropic contribution and quantify the contribution of sound emission, in compliance with current acoustic regulations.

Among the solutions to mitigate this noise source, acoustic treatments are not sufficient, therefore it is desirable to promote the use of new strategies capable of encouraging virtuous behavior in people. In this sense, noise awareness campaigns have been organized and monitoring devices have been introduced, such as an “acoustic traffic light” which continuously detects the level of anthropogenic noise and warns, through light feedback, when it becomes disturbing.

Relatori

Sonja di Blasio

Sonja Di Blasio, PhD Candidate in Management, Production and Design, is a researcher at the Applied Acoustics Group of the Politecnico di Torino. In her research activity she has been involved in the development and validation of a device for monitoring and controlling anthropogenic noise. She has participated in entrepreneurship and innovation programs.

Dario D_Orazio

Dario D’Orazio, electronic engineer, PhD in applied acoustics. He has been working in the applied acoustics group of the University of Bologna since 2007. He deals with the acoustic quality of performance, work and teaching environments. UNI expert member since 2011, he collaborated in the drafting of UNI 11532 standards.

IMG-20190121-WA0001

Enrico Gallo is an environmental engineer and has been working for the Public Administration for 15 years in the field of urban sustainability, GIS analysis and environmental acoustics. He represents Eurocities, the association of major European cities, at the Noise Expert Group of the European Commission. He has coordinated projects and implementation activities of Italian and European legislation at urban level, with contributions of procedural, technological and communication innovation, presented at national and international conferences. He is currently technical manager at the Environment Area of ​​the City of Torino.

27/11/20

Friday 27 November 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

Dinner invitation: it takes an ear!

Moderator Sergio Luzzi

At the webinar will attend Prof. Bottalico, Eng Tombolato and Master Pizzaiolo Pappalardo as guests. Prof. Bottalico will discuss the results of a study on restaurant acoustics that involved participants over the age of sixty with and without hearing problems. The findings link background noise in a restaurant with diners’ vocal effort and conversation quality. Eng. Tombolato will discuss the acoustic design of catering facilities by introducing the concept of acoustic capacity. Master Pizzaiolo Pappalardo will discuss acoustics from the point of view of the restaurateur. Pappalardo is the owner of La Cascina dei Saporil in Rezzato (BS) winner of the “Best Acoustics” award assigned by the Guide of the Italian Touring Club “Hotels and Restaurants of Italy 2020” for the best acoustics with style in Northern Italy.

Relatori

Pasquale Bottalico

Pasquale Bottalico, Master’s degree in Telecommunication Engineering and PhD in Metrology, Politecnico di Torino. As a lecturer in Audioloiga at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign he deals with the interaction between speech and environmental acoustics. He has worked as a consultant in the environmental acoustics sectors. He is the author of 40 publications in impact journals on acoustics and about a hundred publications including conference articles and abstracts.



		
Andrea Tombolato

Andrea Tombolato, Master’s degree in Physics, University of Padova. He has carried out and continues his consulting activity in the acoustics and vibrations sectors for the benefit of companies, design companies, public bodies. He is an effective member of the Italian Acoustics Association (AIA); since 2014 he is a member of the Board of Directors. Since 2015 he has been included, representing AIA, the Italian Acoustics Association, in UNI Working Groups (National Technical Standardization Body) operating in the field of acoustics. In 2015 he was called to be part of the ISPRA / Ministry of the Environment working group aimed at adapting the national acoustic legislation to the European provisions of the sector, directives 2002/49 / EC, 2000/14 / EC and 2006/123 / CE and Regulation n. 765/2008 / EC. He is author and co-author of scientific works on acoustics.

Antonio Pappalardo

Antonio Pappalardo, Mastro Pizzaiolo, La Cascina dei Sapori, Rezzato (Brescia), I couldn’t say when my passion for cooking began, because I am convinced it was born with me, and it has always accompanied me. Even as a child I loved helping my parents while they worked in their restaurant, and it wasn’t just a game, there was more. Something was probably already starting to make me understand what my path would be, and I always tried to follow it. It was precisely following it that I chose the hotel school for my high school education, graduating in 2008. And always following the same path I started my first work experiences, from which I tried to make the most to give even more definition to my passion. I wanted my training in the kitchen to be complete, and at the same time help me to take a specific direction. I worked in the kitchen, pastry shop and pizzeria, and that’s how I understood that the right answer for me was pizza. Because with pizza I didn’t really have to choose, I knew I was giving my creativity the possibility of having no limits. From the appetizer to the dessert, any dish I wanted to make I could combine with a well-leavened disc of dough, transforming a dish that was already unique into something even more special.

11/12/20

Friday 11 December 2020 13.30-14.30

Webinar on

The new UNI 11532-2: 2020 on school spaces

Moderator Arianna Astolfi

The new UNI 11532-2: 2020 standard for the acoustic quality of school environments aims to bring order in a field of standards that has been stratified over time and is not free from ambiguity. Made mandatory by the CAM of 2017, the standard is part of a broad context of European regulations on the subject (such as the English BB93, the German DIN 18041) introducing two substantial innovations. The first concerns the indication of a compliance interval of the reverberation time, according to the intended use and the volume of the environment. For intended uses that require the static presence of a person, this interval takes into account the acoustic absorption of the occupants. The second novelty concerns the forecast evaluation of the C50 / STI intelligibility criteria. The use of these descriptors, already anticipated in the CAM 2017, is detailed here and related to the specific context of the school environments (e.g. the role of background noise, the vocal effort of teachers …). The introduction of new design logics has consequences on the materials and on the different design criteria to be implemented according to the grade of the structure. Some case studies will be discussed and analyzed from several points of view: respect for design criteria, perception analysis, choice of materials.

Relatori

Dario D_Orazio

Dario D’Orazio, electronic engineer, PhD in applied acoustics. He has been working in the applied acoustics group of the University of Bologna since 2007. He deals with the acoustic quality of performance, work and teaching environments. UNI expert member since 2011, he collaborated in the drafting of UNI 11532 standards.

IMG_20191019_131513678

Daniele Ponteggia, graduated in electronic engineering from the University of Perugia and qualified to practice as an engineer, he is enrolled in the Order of Engineers of the Province of Terni. Competent technician in environmental acoustics.
He mainly works as a consultant in the field of architectural acoustics and electroacoustics with particular experience in the use of CAD acoustic measurement and simulation software. He is an expert in measuring and characterizing electroacoustic transducers.
It also deals with sound level measurements, drafting of acoustic impact assessments, on-site and forecast evaluations of the passive acoustic requirements of buildings, design of acoustic correction interventions.
He is a member of the Audio Engineering Society’s “Acoustic and Sound Source Modeling” and “Loudspeaker Modeling and Measurement” working groups.

CC

Cristina Carrus graduated in Building Engineering-Architecture. After working in the world of design, she attended the Master in Architecture, Structures and Technologies, deepening the issues relating to new construction technologies, environmental sustainability, energy efficiency.
In 2012 he began working for Ecophon Saint-Gobain, developing skills related to acoustics and acoustic comfort design. It carries out Market Development activities, researching different accounts and accompanying customers during the specification, design process up to the installation on site of the acoustic solutions adopted.

Scheda
Event Details
  • Start Date
    2 October 2020 13:30
  • End Date
    11 December 2020 14:30
0